About our new website

National FASD new website

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We are so excited to share with you our new website, packed full of FREE resources and hope for better tomorrows for all individuals with FASD, their families and those who support them.

We owe a HUGE thank you to all our friends with FASD and others with lived experience  who have shared with us their photos and their insights as we have been building this site, as well as to all the consultants and experts who have helped with content.

A big shout out to James Craker of crackerjac.com, who designed the site and our rebranding. He surely deserves an award for translating our ideas into this amazing dynamic site where you can browse, explore, come back again and again when you are ready for more.

As a foster carer, I know how vitally important it is to have resources on FASD. National Organisation for FASD has a wonderful range of information for parents, carers and professionals that could really help them understand FASD, and more importantly, help the young people who are affected.

Working on the National FASD site was (and is) an exciting process. I wanted to reflect the diverse experiences of those affected with FASD and those supporting those individuals, with bold colours, whilst maintaining an easy to use interface. 

James Craker, Foster Carer and website designer.

We are excited about our new look with such vibrant colours (because we all know life for those with FASD is not ‘pastel’ – FASD is bold!) Our new logo is in a brain shape, because at its root FASD is about unique brains, and it emphasises interconnectedness, because that is how we get through. Working together is how we will bring about the change needed for better recognition and support for FASD and to reduce the prevalence of FASD in the future. Connecting the dots about FASD and its many facets, helps people find the way forward.

This new website is just getting started. Some key features include:

  • We have a new section for adults with FASD.
  • We’ve added lots of videos.
  • We are thrilled to launch our new FASD in Focus series, 2-page summaries of some key areas that you can easily print out and bring with you to appointments, to support groups.
  • We will post regular blogs to help you understand what’s new and what’s happening in the news.

Please browse and take your time digesting the content.  It’s a lot. It’s an ongoing journey as we all learn more about FASD every day. If we are missing anything or if you would like more information about some aspect of the site – please send us a message. As always, we greatly value your input.

But wait, there’s more! 

Check out our other new websites. We have been busy during COVID-19 lockdown!

We have set up two additional websites with specific target audiences.

  1. In addition to this site, we have PreventFASD.info – aimed at 15-25 year olds. This website features the award-winning film RISK and the #WhyRiskIt national competition. PreventFASD has lots of information about the importance of avoiding alcohol in pregnancy. It has learning resources for classrooms and groups, active social media channels and much more.
  2. Coming October 2020, the www.FASD.me website will launch for children and young people with FASD.  It will have interactive resources, videos and other materials designed to help young people with FASD understand  and own their diagnoses. This is part of our partnership project with the Seashell Trust, funded by the Department of Health. (By agreement,  National  FASD holds all rights to this site and the materials it contains.) For 9/9 international FASD Day, we are pre-releasing “Walk Along With Me” a song/video created for the Me and My FASD website. Created with input from more than 70 people with FASD and performed by young people with FASD. This song is a powerful call from those with FASD for the understanding and support they deserve.

 

“Try and live in my shoes."

Rachel, a young adult with FASD, responding to one-sided news stories this week Tweet
Listen to Joanna Buckard addressing the importance of recording alcohol-exposed pregnancies to ensure those with FASD can be diagnosed, on Times Radio Drive with John Pienaar, 17 September 2020

More to explore

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